This is the origin story of former Special Forces operative turned mercenary Wade Wilson, who after being subjected to a rogue experiment that leaves him with accelerated healing powers, adopts the alter ego Deadpool. Armed with his new abilities and a dark, twisted sense of humor, Deadpool hunts down the man who nearly destroyed his life.Written by 20th Century Fox


The first thing we noticed was how inventive the storytelling is. The film throws you into the action from the first moment (literally: the very first moment) and then it goes back and forth in brilliant and unexpected ways to slowly unspool the story of this insane – but oddly charming – antihero. Flashbacks and fast-forwards can be annoying as hell, but when done right, they can help render even a somewhat simple story fresh and exciting. And that’s exactly how Deadpool felt to me right from the start: like a fresh (if somewhat dirty) jolt of energy.

The action itself is beautifully designed, employing playful visuals and using pretty much every camera technique available; it never feels repetitive and the pacing is close to perfection. But, and that was probably the key to us liking the film so much, there’s a beating heart underneath all the action and carnage, and that has a lot to do with how brilliantly Ryan Reynolds portrays the character and the great chemistry he has with co-star Morena Baccarin. What came as a complete surprise to me was how unabashedly romantic Deadpool is. The love story in this film is probably the most sincere we’ve ever seen in a superhero movie and it gives the film the strong emotional core which so many of these movies lack.

The humor, which we initially feared would just be non-stop juvenile wisecracks and soon become distracting, also works surprisingly well. Not every line or every joke lands – but that’s the beauty of this character: they don’t really need to. Deadpool can’t help himself; as long as he’s able to breathe he’ll crack wise and make fun of himself and those around him. It’s a clinical condition; he’s not a stand-up comedian whose jokes need to land: he’s a madman (albeit a very entertaining one) and the comedy in his case was born out of tragedy.

Despite all  praise, it’s not a perfect film. The villain in this revenge tale could have been more memorable and the story itself is a bit too derivative to really do its highly unconventional protagonist (he insists he’s not a hero) justice: but it’s a damn good first entry in a franchise that will hopefully explore the character and his world to a much larger extent in the sequel(s). And it’s actually a very important film for another reason. If Deadpool is a financial success – which at this point is already clear it will be – this could play a vital role in how studios henceforth view the financial prospects of R-rated superhero films, and we’ll hopefully see more of them in the future.

Many people might feel different – and we respect their opinion – but we’ve grown tired of the entirely bloodless CGI overkill in all those 200 million productions where even the most terrible villains talk like Mormon schoolgirls. we mean: there’s a gigantic audience out there that is over the age of 18, loves to read comic books and can absolutely handle real-world language, real-world sex and real-world violence in superhero movies. This genre is so diverse; it’s ridiculous to believe just because comic books have pictures in them all film adaptations – regardless of the material – must automatically be made for kids in order to be successful.

This is pure genius and a great movie for friends, lovers and anyone that wants a good laugh but not for teenagers due to the movie rating, strong violence and language throughout, sexual content and graphic nudity


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Directed by Tim Miller |  Writting Credits Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick


  • Ryan Reynolds as Wade Wilson / Deadpool
  • Morena Baccarin as Vanessa: Wade’s girlfriend.
  • Ed Skrein as Francis / Ajax
  • T. J. Miller as Jack Hammer / Weasel
  • Gina Carano as Angel Dust
  • Brianna Hildebrand as Negasonic Teenage Warhead
  • Stefan Kapicic as Piotr Rasputin / Colossus
  • Leslie Uggams as Blind Al
  • Jed Rees as The Recruiter
  • Stan Lee will have a cameo appearance as a strip club MC.